Your Checkup

Therapists receive training in Graston Technique

by Erin Cox | Dec 14, 2015

Graston Technique helps with tension in soft tissue The Therapy Solutions team at Van Wert County Hospital has recently completed training in Graston Technique®, a procedure that treats areas of soft tissue restriction and tightness in muscles, tendons, and ligaments that can reduce range of motion.

Graston Technique® is a type of Instrument-Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization (IASTM).  Graston Technique® is preferred over other systems of IASTM because of the required education before a facility can be labeled certified, the instrument design and weight, the treatment angles, and the technique process.

“Graston Technique is a form of therapy that many doctors recommend,” Debby Compton, the director of physical rehabilitation at Van Wert County Hospital, said. “We are happy to have our therapists trained in a technique that will better serve our patients.”

Patients claim to notice improvements in a short amount of time.

By using the stainless steel instruments used in Graston Technique®, trained clinicians can feel areas of restriction in the muscles and soft tissue. Once those areas are identified, then the clinician can use the instruments to break up the tightness and restrictions

Users of Graston Technique®, also referred to as GT, claim it decreases overall time of treatment which allows for a faster recovery, reduces need for anti-inflammatory medication, and resolves chronic conditions thought to be permanent.

"GT has been an integral and largely beneficial application in our care and treatment of the acute and chronic conditions that affect professional baseball players,” Lonnie Soloff, senior director of medical services for the Cleveland Indians, said on the GT website. “Our efforts at edema reduction in acute ankle sprains and contusions (hit by pitch, foul tips) have been more successful as a direct result of implementing GT in our protocols. We have seen tremendous outcome results in chronic conditions such as tendinosis, scar tissue impediments and fascial pain syndromes. Our athletes often present to the athletic training room requesting GT."

The GT-trained therapists, both the physical and occupational therapists, at Van Wert County Hospital are already noticing improvements in their patients who have started receiving GT therapy.

“We have patients who really like GT and we are excited to see what a difference this makes for our patients,” Compton said.